Abuse & Trauma recovery quotes


Dissociated trauma memories don’t reveal themselves like ordinary memories. Like pieces of a puzzle, they escape the primitive part of our brain where the trauma has been stored without words.

These starkly vivid and detailed images are defined by our five senses and emotions, but there is no ‘story’. So we are left trying to comprehend the incomprehensible while trying to describe what doesn’t make sense.

Healing is about collecting as many pieces as possible. It’s finding words for what we are seeing and feeling – even when it sounds crazy. It’s daring to speak our truth until it makes sense.”
Jeanne McElvaney, Spirit Unbroken: Abby’s Story

“Overcoming abuse doesn’t just happen, It takes positive steps everyday. Let today be the day you start to move forward.”
Assunta Harris, A Sheep Amongst Wolves

“When enforcing our boundaries, first and foremost, we are caring for ourselves, but we are also helping others to have a clear understanding of what we consider acceptable behavior. We are reflecting back to them what is not acceptable and, therefore, providing them an opportunity to consider that information and make necessary changes. If we ignore the behavior or accept the behavior, not only are we undermining ourselves, but we are denying the other person an opportunity to learn about themselves and to grow, and ultimately, we deny them the opportunity for a healthy relationship with us. -Psychotherapist Donna Wood in The Inspired Caregiver”
Peggi Speers, The Inspired Caregiver: Finding Joy While Caring for Those You Love

“When you feel caught in the web of childhood abuse, find words to describe it. Write them. Say them. Express them. In safe places, with safe people.”
Jeanne McElvaney, Childhood Abuse: Tips to Change Child Abuse Effects

“Logic becomes a loud voice when the wall of our past abuse begin to crack with awareness. But that’s our adult speaking. The child within, who had the experience, talks to us through flashes of insights.
Trust your perceptions. They are a powerful guide in healing.”
Jeanne McElvaney, Childhood Abuse: Tips to Change Child Abuse Effects

“Our abusive parent didn’t give us the gentle, encouraging nurturing we needed. But healing invites us to give our inner child the kind of loving empowerment that will help us reach our potential and celebrate our spirit. Move past what you wished you could have experienced and embrace the uncommon, sweet possibilities of being your own best parent.”
Jeanne McEvlaney

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s